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DocWatch
squid
Twitterit?
News stories about "squid," with punchlines: http://apocadocs.com/d.pl?squid
Related Scary Tags:
ecosystem interrelationships  ~ koyaanisqatsi  ~ holyshit  ~ toxic buildup  ~ ocean acidification  ~ overfishing  ~ anthropogenic change  ~ massive die-off  ~ marine mammals  ~ endocrine disruptor  ~ PCBs  



Wed, Feb 3, 2010
from Telegraph.co.uk:
Giant squid invade California
Giant squid weighing up to 60 pounds (27 kilograms) have swum into waters off Newport Beach and are being caught by sport fishermen by the hundreds. The squid were noticed last week and fishermen started booking twilight fishing trips to catch them the huge creatures.... The Humboldt squid is also called the jumbo squid or jumbo flying squid and squirts ink to protect itself. They can grow up to 100 pounds in weight and six feet long and follow food sources.... But the giant squid is not unknown off the coast of America. In September a record-breaking 19ft-long squid, weighing 103 pounds, was caught off the Gulf of Mexico. ...


If they follow food sources... and this is unprecedented... then what's happening with their normal food sources?

ApocaDoc
permalink

Tue, Dec 16, 2008
from New Scientist:
Jumbo squids in acid: What future oceans hold in store
Swimming through warmer, more acidic oceans will feel like swimming through molasses for jumbo squid.... Jumbo squid blood carries very little oxygen -- with each cycle through its body, the oxygen can be used up entirely. This means they must "recharge" constantly, and makes the animals very dependent on what oxygen is available in the water around them. Yet, the warmer water is, the smaller the amount of oxygen it can hold.... To make matters worse, the squid's blood cells are able to carry even less oxygen in acidic water.... Last year, the first study to simultaneously track a predator and its prey suggested that sperm whales may take advantage of moments when jumbo squid slow down to catch them. ...


It's like a bad dream -- the predator is gaining on you, and you seem to be running in slo-mo...

ApocaDoc
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Thu, Oct 23, 2008
from findingDulcinea:
Dead Humboldt Squid Wash Up on Oregon, Washington Beaches
The Oregonian reports that beaches along Oregon's northern coast have seen an influx of dead Humboldt squid washing ashore over the past few days. The squid are typically about 3 1/2 feet long, and thrive in the warmer waters of Southern California and Mexico. However, these squid swam north in search of food.... "The fact this is happening in both hemispheres could be a sign it is tied in with global warming," but noted that pieces of the puzzle were still missing. There are possible explanations other than global warming. Some biologists suggest that overfishing of the squid's "natural predators, including tuna, sharks and swordfish" has allowed Humboldt squid to swim further. ...


There are so many tentacles to this problem.

ApocaDoc
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Tue, Sep 16, 2008
from Engineer Live:
Studies confirm challenges of man-made pollutants in the environment
New evidence that chemical contaminants are finding their way into the deep-sea food web has been found in deep-sea squids and octopods, including the strange-looking 'vampire squid'. These species are food for deep-diving toothed whales and other predators. "It was surprising to find measurable and sometimes high amounts of toxic pollutants in such a deep and remote environment," Vecchione said. Among the chemicals detected were tributyltin (TBT), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs), and dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT). They are known as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) because they don't degrade and persist in the environment for a very long time. ...


That's a whale of a problem, POP.

ApocaDoc
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Tue, Jul 1, 2008
from Xinhua (China):
Crustaceans, squid found where once there were fish
Researchers are pointing fingers at global warming again, saying it has caused dramatic shifts in some aquatic communities in which fish populations die off and crabs, lobsters and squid take over. The finding comes from a new analysis of 50 years worth of fish-trawling data collected in Narragansett Bay and adjacent Rhode Island Sound but may apply elsewhere, researchers said.... "We think there has been a shift in the food web resulting in more of the productivity being consumed in the water column," Collie explained. "Phytoplankton are increasingly being grazed by zooplankton, which are then eaten by planktivorous fish, rather than the phytoplankton sinking to the bottom and being consumed by bottom fish. It's a rerouting of that production from the bottom to the top." ...


A warming tide lifts all phytoplankton.
It's morning in the top layer.
The "trickle up" theory in action.

ApocaDoc
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Fri, Jun 27, 2008
from University of Rhode Island, via EurekAlert:
Climate change causing significant shift in composition of coastal fish communities
A detailed analysis of data from nearly 50 years of weekly fish-trawl surveys in Narragansett Bay and adjacent Rhode Island Sound has revealed a long-term shift in species composition, which scientists attribute primarily to the effects of global warming. According to Jeremy Collie, professor of oceanography at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography, the fish community has shifted progressively from vertebrate species (fish) to invertebrates (lobsters, crabs and squid) and from benthic or demersal species those that feed on the bottom to pelagic species that feed higher in the water column. "This is a pretty dramatic change"... said Collie. ...


Life's going to where the rent is cheap
(though it's a tough neighborhood).

ApocaDoc
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Tue, Jun 10, 2008
from NOAA Fisheries Service:
Persistent Man-made Chemical Pollutants Found in Deep-sea Octopods and Squids
New evidence that chemical contaminants are finding their way into the deep-sea food web has been found in deep-sea squids and octopods.... These species are food for deep-diving toothed whales and other predators.... "It was surprising to find measurable and sometimes high amounts of toxic pollutants in such a deep and remote environment," Vecchione said. Among the chemicals detected were tributyltin (TBT), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs), and dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT). ...


Maybe we'll end up making the marine life
too toxic to eat before
we've scraped the ocean clean of them.

ApocaDoc
permalink

Fri, May 2, 2008
from Los Angeles Times:
Oxygen-poor ocean zones are growing
"Oxygen-starved waters are expanding in the Pacific and Atlantic as ocean temperatures increase with global warming, threatening fisheries and other marine life, a study published today concludes... The low-oxygen, or hypoxic, zones may also be connected to the Pacific coast invasion of the Humboldt, or jumbo, squid. These voracious predators, which can grow 6 feet long, appear to be taking advantage of their tolerance for oxygen-poor waters to escape predators and devour local fish, another team of scientists theorizes." ...


Picture this: Someday there will be NO oxygen left in the ocean, occupied by only one GIGANTIC jumbo squid!

ApocaDoc
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Sun, Apr 27, 2008
from McClatchy:
Jumbo squid invade waters off Pacific coast
"They aren't your normal calamari. But the jumbo squid now lurking off the Pacific Northwest coast could threaten salmon runs and signal yet another change in the oceans brought on by global warming. The squid, which can reach seven feet long and weigh up to 110 pounds, are aggressive, thought to hunt in packs and can move at speeds of up to 15 mph. In Mexico, they're known as diablos rojos, or red devils. They reportedly will attack divers when they feel threatened.... "It's not rare anymore. They were always thought to be a transient visitor; now it appears they are resident." ...


Whoa dude these are monsters! We're gonna need, like, action stars to fight 'em!

ApocaDoc
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